Teaser of “Little Tango had a secret”

Do you want to know a secret?

I have never worked at a company such as Tango/04. I mean, such as the company I envisioned to create, back in 1991.

Children rapidly find a public figure to take as example when they start playing a sport. But it is much more difficult when there is no model to imitate. Even in life, in general, it is difficult to find far-reaching ethical models. But at least it is easy to find antimodels.

My antimodel were the monopolistic corporations of that time, such as Telefonica and Iberia, the Spanish phone and airline companies, whose customer service, back then, seemed to be led by highly sadistic people.

I wanted to work for a company that was just the opposite. And, luckily, we eventually found our way.

Well, soon I will reveal here the secret that made us compete and thrive in the tough IT market for more than 25 years. The ultimate key factor of our success, that is.

Just bear with me a bit more.

Coming soon to a Congress near you: The Dilbert Factor

Dilbert Factor

Do you want to be much, much more successful? After introducing The Dilbert Factor at the Buenos Aires University in December and last month in an exclusive session for Catalonian entrepreneurs, I’ll be presenting at the itSMF/ISACA Congress in Barcelona this very Thursday (April 16th) the one and only “Engineering Success: The Dilbert Factor and other stuff I was not taught at the University”. Dilbert sessions coming up: one for Tango/04 customers in Argentina (May 5th) and hopefully many, many more (stay tuned).

The Dilbert Factor is my new keynote speech based on 30+ years of business / technical / life experience: a not-to-be-missed collection of academic and pragmatic practices to achieve success and be happier, taller and more handsome. Not all the stuff is guaranteed to work, though.

How to be a Great CIO (X): Attend the European Monitoring Symposium

MonitoringSymposium2014-EN

It is not because it is the only European event solely dedicated to Monitoring, it is not because we are going to present a radical change in the way leading companies do business, it is not because of the fine Mediterranean cuisine, the nice people or the awesome venue.

Well, it is because of all these as well. And it is because of the nice surprises (many of them), but the main reason to attend the Monitoring Symposium is to propel your career forward, to go further faster, whether you are a CIO or a CISO or you are one in the making.

Particularly now, when not advancing means going back.

Because monitoring, understood as Corporate Visibility, is really powerful stuff (hey, that’s what I’ve created this blog for). A wonderful opportunity that many pass on, and regret when it is too late. 

And what we are introducing is completely new. Promise.

Well, I said it already. Now it is up to you.

Hope to see you in Sitges this Friday (May 23rd)!

Hugs.

Magic

Quote

If you’re lucky, you’ll have the experience of working in a high-performing team early in your career.

As you continue working, you will soon realize that high-performing teams are truly magical, and more rare than you might have first expected.

And if you keep working, you’ll find yourself becoming committed to creating high-performing teams. You won’t succeed every time, but you’ll try.

(Luke Hohmann)

Great article on improving team performance by aligning their values here (game included!).

Teaser of “How to be a Great CIO (VII): Listen to Jim Collins”

You know Jim, right? He is probably the world’s #1 Management Guru these days, and his best-selling book Good to Great inspired an entire generation of leaders. He is the guy who discovered that great leaders don’t need to be charismatic (and added that charisma could even be a liability!). Look, I got some great new personal tips from Jim himself yesterday and I’d love to share them with you. Tomorrow, that is. See you then.

Mercenaries, Volunteers, and Contemplators

This past Easter I stayed in a hotel on the coast of Catalonia. It wasn’t ugly. It wasn’t a horrible experience. But there were a number of details that caught my eye.

For example, the cheese was horrendous. They seemed to have bought the cheapest cheese available; I imagined a dialogue between the dairy provider and the procurement manager of the hotel.  Continue reading

How to be a better CIO (IV): Lead an orchestra

In December we usually have a general gathering with the entire company in Barcelona. We like to do a different activity each year: archery, kart racing, touring the old city competing to see who is first to find a series of historical keys (which is called a gymkhana here), things like that. And after that, go out to eat, of course. Continue reading